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ADM1024ARUZ Datasheet(PDF) 18 Page - ON Semiconductor

Part No. ADM1024ARUZ
Description  System Hardware Monitor with Remote Diode Thermal Sensing
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Maker  ONSEMI [ON Semiconductor]
Homepage  http://www.onsemi.com
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ADM1024ARUZ Datasheet(HTML) 18 Page - ON Semiconductor

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ADM1024
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18
Table 5. Fan Speeds and Divisors
Time Per
Divisor RPM
Nominal RPM
Rev (ms)
70% RPM
Rev 70% (ms)
60% RPM
Rev 60% (ms)
÷ 1
8800
6.82
6160
9.74
5280
11.36
÷ 2
4400
13.64
3080
19.48
2640
22.73
÷ 4
2200
27.27
1540
38.96
1320
45.44
÷ 8
1100
54.54
770
77.92
660
90.90
Limit Values
Fans in general will not over−speed if run from the correct
voltage, so the failure condition of interest is under−speed
due to electrical or mechanical failure. For this reason only,
low speed limits are programmed into the limit registers for
the fans. It should be noted that, since fan period rather than
speed is being measured, a fan failure interrupt will occur
when the measurement exceeds the limit value.
Monitoring Cycle Time
The monitoring cycle time depends on the fan speed and
number of tachometer output pulses per revolution. Two
complete periods of the fan tachometer output (three rising
edges) are required for each fan measurement. Therefore, if
the start of a fan measurement just misses a rising edge, the
measurement can take almost three tachometer periods. In
order to read a valid result from the fan value registers, the
total monitoring time allowed after starting the monitoring
cycle should, therefore, be three tachometer periods of
FAN1 plus three tachometer periods of FAN2 at the lowest
normal fan speed.
Although the fan monitoring cycle and the analog input
monitoring cycle are started together, they are not
synchronized in any other way.
Fan Manufacturers
Manufacturers of cooling fans with tachometer outputs
are listed below:
NMB Tech
9730 Independence Ave.
Chatsworth, California 91311
Phone: 818−341−3355; Fax: 818−341−8207
Model
Frame Size
Airflow
CFM
2408NL
2.36 in sq × 0.79 in; (60 mm sq × 20 mm)
9–16
2410ML
2.36 in sq × 0.98 in; (60 mm sq × 25 mm)
14–25
3108NL
3.15 in sq × 0.79 in; (80 mm sq × 20 mm)
25–42
3110KL
3.15 in sq × 0.98 in; (80 mm sq × 25 mm)
25–40
Mechatronics Inc.
P.O. Box 613
Preston, WA 98050
800−453−4569
Models—Various sizes available with tachometer output option.
Sanyo Denki, America, Inc.
468 Amapola Avenue
Torrance, CA 90501
310−783−5400
Models—109P Series
Chassis Intrusion Input
The chassis intrusion input is an active high
input/open−drain output intended for detection and
signalling of unauthorized tampering with the system. An
external circuit powered from the system’s CMOS backup
battery is used to detect and latch a chassis intrusion event,
whether or not the system is powered up. Once a chassis
intrusion has been detected and latched, the CI input will
generate an interrupt when the system is powered up.
The actual detection of chassis intrusion is performed by
an external circuit that will, for example, detect when the
cover has been removed. A wide variety of techniques may
be used for the detection, for example:
Microswitch that opens or closes when the cover is
removed.
Reed switch operated by magnet fixed to the cover.
Hall−effect switch operated by magnet fixed to the
cover.
Phototransistor that detects light when the cover is
removed.
The chassis intrusion interrupt will remain asserted until
the external detection circuit is reset. This can be achieved
by setting Bit 7 of the Chassis Intrusion Clear Register to
one, which will cause the CI pin to be pulled low for at least
20 ms. This register bit is self−clearing.
The chassis intrusion circuit should be designed so that it
can be reset by pulling its output low. A suitable chassis
intrusion circuit using a photo−transistor is shown in
Figure 30. Light falling on the photo−transistor when the PC
cover is removed will cause it to turn on and pull up the input
of 1, thus setting the latch N3/N4. After the cover is
replaced, a low reset on the CI output will pull down the
input of N4, resetting the latch.
Figure 30. Chassis Intrusion Detector and Latch
74HC132
CI
MRD901
1N914
5.0 V
1N914
N1
N2
N3
N4
CMOS
BACKUP
BATTERY
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
470kW
100kW
10kW


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